Research UNIX v8

    v8 on SIMH

So what the heck is Research UNIX v8?  Or even what is Research UNIX?  Well a query against utzoo gave me this answer:

>I've seen people that use System V and the like refer to their Unix as
>"tenth edition" or "ninth edition", or whatever. I've always seen things as
>"System V release n", or whatever. Anyone know the difference between these
>different naming schemes ?

There are actually three designations: Versions, Editions, and
System/Releases. The proper names of the first six Unixen were
"The #th Edition". Colloquially, people called them "Version #".
The Version Sixth Edition split off several variations, one of which
became Version Seven (the Seventh Edition) and sired BSD. From
several others, System III was born, and later named System V.
Tacked onto this name were Release numbers and yes, Versions.
So you will see things line SVr3v2.

The Eighth, Ninth, and Tenth Editions seldom left Bell Labs
and are also referred to as "Research UNIX". Another system
(not UNIX) they are playing with is called "Plan 9". Every so
often, a feature, such as STREAMS, finds its way into System V.

In some ways, Research UNIX is closer to BSD than to System V.

In short, UNIX began it’s life as a research project.  Until recently versions 1-6 & 32v were available to the public.  However the later versions, 8,9,10 were not.  However thanks to the work over at TUHS it’s available for non commercial use:
Alcatel-Lucent USA Inc has permitted usage saying "will not assert its
copyright rights with respect to any non-commercial copying, distribution,
performance, display or creation of derivative works of 
Research Unix®1 Editions 8,9, and 10."

So awesome!

The version of Research v8 is split onto 2 tape images, one for the graphical terminals, and the other for the OS install onto the VAX.  The distribution is not suitable for any standalone operation, and requires a previously installed 4.1BSD machine, with a second disk to install v8 onto.  Part of the installation requires you to compile your own kernel.  I ran into a bit of problems as it’s not a 100% process, but after referencing this guide from David du Colombier, I had the system up and running.  Naturally reading the installation manual helped a great deal too.

As always there is strange artifacts left in the backup, such as this scoreboard from rogue:

Top Ten Rogueists:
Rank Score Name
1 5545 Rog-O-Matic XIII for mjs: quit on level 17.
2 5043 ken: killed on level 23 by a dragon.
3 3858 zip: killed on level 16 by an invisible stalker.
4 3249 Rog-O-Matic VII: killed on level 16 by an invisible stalker.
5 2226 Rog-O-Matic VII: killed on level 13 by a troll.
6 2172 St. Jude: killed on level 13 by a troll.
7 1660 Rog-O-Matic VII: quit on level 11.
8 1632 Chipmunk the Jello: killed on level 10 by a centaur.
9 844 Rog-O-Matic VII: quit on level 5.
10 401 Rog-O-Matic VII: killed on level 4 by a snake.

Does this mean Ken Thompson was an avid rogue fan?  Perhaps.  Naturally I quickly compiled the v100 version of aclock, and had it running.

aclock on v8

I’ll have to edit this and more and more as I find out, but I’ve been busy in real life, and of course I know that in addition to v8, there is also v9 & v10 to tackle.

As always, if you want you can download my pre-installed from my site : researchv8.7z

You will have to bring your own copy of the SIMH VAX-11/780 simulator.  As of 31/3/2017 ther is issues with the github version of SIMH, and you will have issues with the disks on the VAX.  You need to disable the async with a simple set command in your ini file:

set noasync

And you should now be good to go!  As always you’ll have to battle the 404 page for the correct link and the username & password.

sorry.

The Harris HCX-9 aka TAHOE platform

A machine born in legend

This is a machine that is shroud in legend, and of course played an integral part of internet history but oddly enough almost all trace of it ever existing has vanished.

The release of BSD, aptly named the 4.3BSD TAHOE release was completed in June of 1988. However shortly after this release the makers of the CPU, Computer Consoles
Incorporated abruptly exited the market killing off the platform.  What is interesting though is that while CCI was manufacturing the TAHOE processor, they also sold it to 3 other OEM’s, Sperry (which merged with Buroughs, and re-branded as Unisys), and ICL Ltd. and Harris is the only other one to have picked up the CPU for inclusion in it’s own machines.  Among them was the HCX-7, and the HCX-9.

The Harris HCX minicomputers were one of the possible machines that the CSRG team at Berkeley saw as a possible successor to the aging VAX line of minicomputers for their operating system.  While this may not have been the first port of UNIX or BSD for that matter, it was the first port of a 32bit BSD, that was included into the main VAX BSD source, and as such could be redistributed with the BSD license (which at the time required an AT&T 32V license).  The fundamental thing this did was to split out the VAX specific code as a mainstream port was to be rolled back into the main CSRG source, unlike any other 3rd party port at this point.

HCX-5

The HCX-5 ran an internal version of 4.2BSD, along with SYSV in a ‘dual universe’ config, while the HCX-9 was to be supported by the CSRG, as the file GENERIC.hcx9 indicates from 4.3BSD TAHOE.  As you can see the HCX-5’s starting price of $124,500 USD is if anything a continuing of the mindset that BSD only ran on super expensive minicomputers.

POWER 6/32 = HCX-9

Indeed from the config file in 4.3BSD TAHOE, we see this:

GENERIC POWER 6/32 (HCX9)

And for quite some time, I’ve always been searching for a CCI POWER 6/32, meanwhile it appears that was merely a reference platform that became the HCX-9 as indicated from the machine config file.  The evidence was hiding in plain sight, as always it was a typo that lead me here as I was searching for TAHOE processors, and came across people looking for GCC on the TAHOE, running BSD.  And following their threads I noticed that they were running Harris minis’ which then lead me to make the connection that the TAHOE was a processor, not just a machine, and that other vendors sold their own machines with the CPU.

Future cut short

Needless to say, once CCI exited the market these machines evaporated so quickly that they are only remembered in legend in BSD.  I’ve seen people debate if the machine actually existed, who put it out, or even what was it exactly? A workstation? Server?  As we can see from the Harris models, it was meant to be a minicomputer, to compete with the likes of the Digitial VAX.

Oracle Worker

As we can see from this ad, with Oracle support and the official porting target of the CSRG the HCX-9 was expected to have a bright future.  Instead it was cut so short there is barely any mention of it even existing.

Sadly this minicomputer target idea continued, as the CSRG sidestepped the commodity 32bit processors, namely the cheaper 68020 & 80386.

So today I came across a ‘new’ 4.1 BSD tape on bitsavers: 4.1_BSD_19810710.zip

4.1 BSD tape

4.1 BSD tape

The label is dated 7/10/81, so I thought this would be fun to install on SIMH.  I chose with the starunix 4.0BSD as a starting point thinking that this should be close enough to boot up 4.1.  However I could not get the boot code to correctly work.  So failing that, I went ahead and ran the 4.0 mkfs, and restor programs, and then swapped tapes to the 4.1 to restore it’s root. dump.  And using the 4.0 disk boot program it worked pretty well!

So I went ahead, and extracted the boot program from the 4.0 tape, and rebuilt the 4.1 tape with the 4.0 standalone boot programs so you can install it from SIMH, if you want to cook up your own install.  You can download it from my site (read the 404 message for the current password) or from sourceforge.

And for those of you who like dmesg output:

 

VAX 11/780 simulator V4.0-0 Beta        git commit id: b8049645

Boot
: hp(0,0)vmunix
123060+27528+24628 start 0xF5C
Berkeley VAX/UNIX Version 4.9  Wed Feb 17 15:27:46 PST 1982
real mem  = 8322048
avail mem = 7738368
mcr0 at tr1
mcr1 at tr2
uba0 at tr3
dz0 at uba0 csr 160100 vec 300, ipl 15
mba0 at tr8
hp0 at mba0 drive 0
hp1 at mba0 drive 1
hp2 at mba0 drive 2
hp3 at mba0 drive 3
mba1 at tr9
ht0 at mba1 drive 0
tu0 at ht0 slave 0
tu1 at ht0 slave 1
root on hp0
WARNING: clock lost 153 days -- CHECK AND RESET THE DATE!
WARNING: should run interleaved swap with >= 2Mb
Automatic reboot in progress...
Mon Feb  2 00:59:55 GMT 1976
/dev/hp0a: 676 files 4278 blocks 3345 free
/dev/rhp0g: 3605 files 18925 blocks 122653 free
Mon Feb  2 00:59:56 GMT 1976
Mounted /usr on /dev/hp0g
preserving editor files
clearing /tmp
starting daemons: update cron accounting network mail printer.
Mon Feb  2 00:59:56 GMT 1976

Berkeley 4.1 VAX/UNIX (Amnesia-Vax)

login: root

Welcome to Berkeley Vax/UNIX (4.1bsd revised 1 Sept. 1981)
Erase is delete
Kill is control-U
#

For the brave the direct link is here to the original tape image on bitsavers.

 

LiteBSD

So I stumbled onto LiteBSD while I was trying to see if I can cross compile 386BSD 0.0 from Windows (it compiles, but triple faults on boot.)

LiteBSD is a 4.4 BSD derived OS for PIC32MZ microcontrollers.

And to make things more fun, Serge Vakulenko has a Qemu fork that includes these simulators so you can run them on Linux and OS X.

So what about us poor Windows users?

Well a few tweeks, and only one annoying bug remains, but it’s easy enough to sidestep and it runs!

4.4BSD-Lite

4.4BSD-Lite

Even better, I got the console to kind of work, although you can still control+c it to kill Qemu.  I guess I could capture the signal being kind of UNIXy.

For some reason when opening the SD card image, it’s already open by the time pic32_sdcard_init is called.  Or so I suspect.  It gets the file handle of 3 which tells me that it shouldn’t be open.  So my fix is lame but it works.  Since something is holding the file that I can’t see, I launch Qemu like this:

qemu-system-mipsel.exe -machine pic32mz-wifire -nographic -serial vc -serial vc -serial vc -serial mon:stdio  -bios boot-wifire.hex -kernel vmunix.hex -hda litebsd.img

with the SD/HDA being litebsd.img but in pic32_sdcard_init I do this:

sprintf(newfname,”%s.SD”,filename);

So you need a dummy file named litebsd.img (it’s just junk but it needs to exist), so whatever is blocking it will block it, then let pic32_sdcard_init open the file litebsd.img.SD which is the real file.

C:\litebsd>qemu-system-mipsel.exe -machine pic32mz-wifire -nographic -serial vc -serial vc -serial vc -serial mon:stdio -bios boot-wifire.hex -kernel vmunix.hex -hda litebsd.img
WARNING: Image format was not specified for ‘litebsd.img’ and probing guessed raw.
Automatically detecting the format is dangerous for raw images, write operations on block 0 will be restricted.
Specify the ‘raw’ format explicitly to remove the restrictions.
Board: chipKIT WiFire
Processor: microAptivP
RAM size: 512 kbytes
Load file: ‘boot-wifire.hex’, 6916 bytes
Load file: ‘vmunix.hex’, 522408 bytes
sdcard: opened d->fd 3
Card0 image ‘litebsd.img’, 339969 kbytes
Copyright (c) 1982, 1986, 1989, 1991, 1993
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

4.4BSD-Lite build 13 compiled 2015-01-20
sergev@ubuntu-sergev:LiteBSD/sys/compile/WIFIRE.pic32
cpu: PIC32MZ2048ECG100 rev A4, 200 MHz
oscillator: system PLL div 1:6 mult x50
real mem = 512 kbytes
avail mem = 344 kbytes
using 18 buffers containing 73728 bytes of memory
spi1 at pins sdi=D14/sdo=C1/sck=D1
spi2 at pins sdi=F0/sdo=D11/sck=G6
spi3 at pins sdi=B10/sdo=C4/sck=B14
spi4 at pins sdi=F5/sdo=G0/sck=D10
uart1 at pins rx=F1/tx=D15, interrupts 112/113/114
uart4 at pins rx=F2/tx=F8, interrupts 170/171/172, console
sd0 at port spi3, pin cs=C3
sd0: type I, size 339968 kbytes, speed 12 Mbit/sec
sd0a: partition type b7, sector 2, size 204800 kbytes
sd0b: partition type b8, sector 409602, size 32768 kbytes
sd0c: partition type b7, sector 475138, size 102400 kbytes
bpf: sl0 attached
bpf: lo0 attached
WARNING: preposterous clock chip time — CHECK AND RESET THE DATE!

starting file system checks.
/dev/rsd0a: file system is clean; not checking
starting network
clearing /tmp
standard daemons: update.
Wed Dec 10 21:06:39 PST 2014

4.4BSD-Lite (bsd.net) (tty4)

login:

So there it is!  As always, you can do the whole telnet console, on port 2023 like the SPARC with:

qemu-system-mipsel.exe -machine pic32mz-wifire -nographic -serial vc -serial vc -serial vc -serial mon:telnet:127.0.0.1:2023,server,wait  -bios boot-wifire.hex -kernel vmunix.hex

In this case, I prefer to use the ‘wait’ portion of the server, so I can watch it boot.  Maybe I’m just weird.  But this way you can control+c to your hearts content.

As always, you can download my image here.

Also for those who like graphical serial connections (???) you can launch it like this:

qemu-system-mipsel.exe -machine pic32mz-wifire  -serial vc -serial vc -serial vc -serial vc  -bios boot-wifire.hex -kernel vmunix.hex -sd litebsd.img

And use control+alt and hunt around for s3, and you’ll have your console….. That you can’t paste into.

**EDIT I found out I forgot to link this with static libgcc so there were missing DLL’s.  sorry, I’ve re-linked and now it’ll just work out of the box (tested with clearing my path on Windows 10).  Next I need to add curses support.

Happy new year!

I thought I’d go ahead and see if I could get Net/2 to build on my own.

Net/2

Net/2

Well it compiles, and tries to boot….   Sadly there is no adb or gdb support.  How on earth did people debug this stuff then?  I’m not sure where the crash location is, or what to do about it.  But I thought this was really cool.

I’ve also tried to track down 4.4BSD encumbered, which was released around the same time as the 4.4BSD-Lite1 which was after the AT&T vs BSDi/CSRG thing..  Or even the release that parallels the Net/2 release…

Anyways, happy 2014!

Some minor work on SIMH

So it’d been a while since I’ve booted it up, and I just went with the 3.8-2 rc2 release (I forget did that version ever get released..?) Anyways since I wanted to run my SIMH instance under a Linux VM..

Soooo I went through some fun to recompile it as a 32bit binary, as the slirp doesn’t work on 64bit machines..

I just built the 11/780 emulator as I wanted to run 4.3 UWisc on my VM (in a VM)..

You can download the build here.

As a reminder the installation instructions for 4.3 BSD Uwisc can be found on gunkies, and all the files needed are on sourceforge.  Also the 4.x BSD if_de.c driver errors out on receiving packets, and I’ve found it easier to just remove the error checking from the driver, and recompile the kernel and just boot that up.

I’m thinking of rebuilding the login process on 4.3 BSD to bring back AberMud, and self service user creation.  Years ago I used to host all kinds of ancient UNIX, and I’d like to bring back at least one..

4.1c BSD

It’s been a long while since I’ve posted anything VAX BSD related.  So I found this ISO image a while back that had all these old versions of BSD on them, but sadly many of them are incomplete, missing parts, and give really no clue on how to use them.  There is even some duplication thrown in there just to complicate things further.  So I figured I’d try one of them, an interim release of 4 BSD and see if I could just overlay a newer release version and see what I get…

VAX780 simulator V3.8-1
Listening on port 23 (socket 156)
loading ra(0,0)boot
Boot
: ra(0,0)vmunix
215688+63964+69764 start 0xf98
4.1c BSD UNIX #2: Tue Aug 28 09:39:12 PDT 1984
real mem  = 8384512
avail mem = 7036928
using 148 buffers containing 838656 bytes of memory
mcr0 at tr1
mcr1 at tr2
uba0 at tr3
hk0 at uba0 csr 177440 vec 210, ipl 15
rk0 at hk0 slave 0
rk1 at hk0 slave 1
uda0 at uba0 csr 172150 vec 774, ipl 15
ra0 at uda0 slave 0
ra1 at uda0 slave 1
zs0 at uba0 csr 172520 vec 224, ipl 15
ts0 at zs0 slave 0
dz0 at uba0 csr 160100 vec 300, ipl 15
mba0 at tr8
root on ra0
WARNING: should run interleaved swap with >= 2Mb
Automatic reboot in progress...
Tue Aug 28 09:54:53 PDT 1984
/dev/rra0a: 836 files, 6010 used, 1419 free (35 frags, 173 blocks)
/dev/rra0h: 6598 files, 41780 used, 320080 free (160 frags, 79980 blocks)
Tue Aug 28 09:54:58 PDT 1984
local daemons: telnetd ftpd tftpd syslog sendmail.
preserving editor files
clearing /tmp
standard daemons: update cron accounting berknet mail printer.
starting network: rshd rexecd rlogind rwhod routed.
Tue Aug 28 09:55:00 PDT 1984

ucbmonet login: root
Last login: Tue Aug 28 09:44:44 on tty00
4.1c BSD UNIX #2: Tue Aug 28 09:39:12 PDT 1984
Master source now lives here; freeze your 4.1c stuff now.
As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not
certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.
                -- Albert Einstein
monet#

Pretty cool.  And oddly enough googling around doesn’t seem to find much about people running 4.1c BSD, but it is significant with the first version of sendmail being bundled, and rogue.

The release also includes TCP/IP support but I haven’t the slightest idea how to use it.  I suppose reading the instructions is key.  But I thought I’d share this little fossil first.

For those who want to try it, you can download it here.  It’s using SIMH, so if you aren’t running Windows, bring your own VAX 11/780 and you’ll be good to go.