CTI Keynote, Cliff Stoll – (Still) Stalking the Wily Hacker

In the off chance you’ve never read it, the book The Cuckoo’s Egg is an incredible read.  However what is more interesting with the passage of time, and with the revelations of various 3 letter agencies is understanding why they were so slow to react, and why they were ultimately dismayed with Stolls’ work to alert others is that they too were no doubt actively exploiting the same exploits that the Russian sponsored German hackers were using.  Much in the way that some vendor holes have remained pretty much during the products entire lifespan (Cisco PIX being one…).

2013-2017 Aclock Binary Contributions

(this is a guest post from Antoni Sawicki aka Tenox)

I was little busy and I didn’t process new binary submissions for over three years. Here they are, more or less in order of appearance.While not a lot for 3 years they are very important historically! Also almost all contributed, thank you all!

AmigaOS bootable floppy disk by Jason Stevens.

Aclock on Amiga

Android port by Adam Gutman. See below, it also runs on a watch!

aclock-android

MVME PowerPC Linux by Plamen Mihaylov.

ELKS by Lorenzo Gatti. This also includes a boot image! It’s hard to believe I somehow missed ELKS in my own efforts. Also there is a boot image available.

MVME M68k NetBSD by Plamen Mihaylov. Thank you for collecting all these beautiful and rare Motorola MVME machines!

HeliOS on Transputer by Michael Bruestle. Oh boy I have been looking for this for quite some time! Unless you started 30 years ago, transputters are rather hard to get into from scratch. This port should also work on Atari ATW800. I wish I had one to test 🙂

BSDI 1.1 by Dima Naumov. This is very cool because of all the flavors of BSD I somehow missed this one! I’m still trying to figure out BSDi, BSD/OS and BSD/386 naming convention. Someone please help.

VxWorks by myself. While VxWorks port existed before it was only compiled for a simulated Pentium (SIMPENTIUM) rather than actual target CPUs. I have came across a set of compilers and built it for ARM, MIPS, PowerPC, SH and Xscale. I still don’t have SPARC. See this post about how to run your own target on VMware.

ReactOS by Dima Naumov. While it’s expected that native Win32 aclock will run on ReactOS, this is a build targeting the OS specifically. Sharp X68000 running Human68k OS, by Jason Stevens. That’s a nice surprise! I’ve been looking for this one for a while. No screenshot for but hopefully Jason will be able to produce one. Human68k has a very cool looking GUI!

Microsoft XENIX 1.0 running on AT/286 by Michal Necasek. This was possible thanks for Michal’s huge efforts to patch this historical os to run on VirtualBox.

I happen to own the original set of floppy disks that Microsoft produced and shipped to various OEMs such as IBM, Radio Shack, Intel, SCO, etc.

The set comes with a development kit which now you can run on a VM. You can read some more about efforts to virtualize Microsoft/IBM Xenix on Michal’s Blog.

Venix/86 on AT/286 by Jim Carpenter. This port was delivered as part of a virtualization challenge, which was won by Jim. Thank you and congratulations again! There also is a runner up entry by Mihai Gaitos which has some fascinating details including about Aurora software that came with the system.

Wyse UNIX for 386 by Mihai Gaitos. This port was delivered as part of a similar virtualization challenge, which was won by Michai. Congrats!

Cisco 1700 (PPC) emulated via Dynamips by Jason Stevens. This one is also very close to my heart because of my networking past and present. I will definitely want to try load it on a physical device! Jason is also working on MIPS version so hopefully this will run on Cisco 2500 and up.

Android Wear. Parker Reed send me this photo of Aclock Android by Adam Gutman running on an actual watch! Wow this is so cool!

BSD/OS 4.1 aka BSDI for SPARC by Plamen Mihaylov. Also thanks to Cory Smelosky for releasing the images!

EFI firmware on various platforms, such as x86, x64, ia64, arm32 and 64 by Natalia Portillo aka Claunia. This aclock can be launched from UEFI Shell or by running EFI standalone application if EFI shell is not available.

This is a screenshot of aclock EFI x64 running on HP DL380 via iLO remote console.

Linux and FreeBSD builds for ARM and PowerPC by Natalia Portillo. Claunia sent me a Christmas package with a aclock builds lot of missing CPUs for Linux and FreeBSD, both 32bit and 64bit PPC and ARM for both OSes. Total 8 binaries!

Singularity on x86 by Natalia Portillo. SingularityOS is a research operating system from Microsoft. Rumor has it Microsoft wanted for it to eventually replace NTOS line with managed code OS. Fortunately it didn’t perform too well and with doom of Windows Vista the project was eventually scrapped. Singularity development kit has been released to the public on CodePlex. Since the OS is text mode only, it was a natural target for Aclock. A port in C# (OMG) has been created and the binary integrated in to the iso boot image.

RISC iX running on Acorn R260 by Raymond Stricklin aka Bear. I was scorching the earth looking for a working copy of RISC iX and there he had it. Thank you. It’s beautiful.

Minix 3 for ARM by Natalia Portillo. Latest release of Minix adds experimental support for ARM architecture. No network and framebuffer but aclock works over a serial console!

Again thank you for all your contributions!

If you want to to help contribute to aclock, there is a wanted list. Some of them come with a monetary reward. Please contact me before undergoing any major work as some of them are under way.

Also, aclock now lives on GitHub, for easier.. everything.

Python command line network speed test

Not bragging..

So you know all the old speedtest.net stuff.  They have their old flash based client, and a html5 client, but what if you are on a bare VPS, and you don’t want to install X and the gigs of desktop to run a simple bandwidth test?

Well install python, and then run this:

curl -s  https://raw.githubusercontent.com/sivel/speedtest-cli/master/speedtest.py | python –

And away it goes!

# curl -s https://raw.githubusercontent.com/sivel/speedtest-cli/master/speedtest.py | python –
Retrieving speedtest.net configuration…
Testing from Joe’s Datacenter (172.86.179.14)…
Retrieving speedtest.net server list…
Selecting best server based on ping…
Hosted by Packet Layer Consulting LLC (Kansas City, KS) [5.37 km]: 5.394 ms
Testing download speed……………………………………………………………………..
Download: 53.06 Mbit/s
Testing upload speed……………………………………………………………………………………….
Upload: 110.83 Mbit/s

Nice!

Just upgraded some RAM

128GB

16x8GB memory.  Sure it’s not the newest, or greatest, but it’s nice to be able to right size the RAM on all my lab crap, and now have all kinds of extra RAM.  The machine is built around SAS, but I don’t have the right sled adapter, and only a single disk.  Although it really doesn’t matter as there is a really nice internal USB slot inside this Dell r710, and VMWare installs just fine onto it. I already had all my virtual machines on an external NAS so it really didn’t matter.

I’ll probably either get more sleds and SAS disks, or some kind of flash PCIE cards.  I haven’t really decided yet.

It’s crazy to think of a time when 128kb was a lot of memory, let alone 1MB, or even a monstrous 16MB. It seemed crazy to hit that 24bit limit of the 286, then the 32bit limit of the 386.. At least we are a ways off from hitting the 64bit limit, but now that I have work servers with 1TB+ of RAM, well, it’s only a matter of time.

Moving to Debian 8

So if you can read this, then the server is working.

After a few errors here and there, it appears to be working now.

Hopefully this clears up the phantom ‘logging in’ issue others were having.  Also I haven’t seen any php5 updates on Debian 7 in a while, so it was time to dump the DB, and copy over into a new VM.

Meet the superfans who spent a decade bringing Daikatana back to life

Daikatana!

No, really I got an email today from Frank Sappone, that his passion project the fixing and overhaul of Daikatana was written up on PCGAMER.  Although my involvement may have gotten edited down, honestly all I did was give that little bit of a push and inspiration that it could be done by spending a good week on installing Solaris, and porting the dedicated server portion from SPARC Solaris, to x86 Solaris.  Once we had it running there, it was far easier to then get it running on Linux and OS X as a dedicated server.  Once we had that push Frank was able to use his great knowledge of Quake/QuakeWorld/Quake II and fix an incredible amount of bugs, and bring it into a fairly good state.

The real star here is of course the Johns, John Carmack for making the source code to Quake/QuakeWorld, Quake II, open so we could always refer back to this code, which Daikatana was based off an early beta of Quake II, and John Romero for giving us the needed source to make it all possible.

11.75 HKD is like $1.50 USD

It’s on sale right now at steam!

You can find Frank’s hard work here on bitbucket.org

For Windows users, you can simply download DK_EXE_030816_FULL.7Z, from his site (mirror).  And from the readme:

It’s a 7zip package. After you’ve downloaded the package you extract it to Daikatana’s folder. If you have Steam installed to it’s default path Daikatana’s folder is located in:

C:\Program Files\Steam\steamapps\common\Daikatana\

(or if you’re running 64-bit Windows):
C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam\steamapps\common\Daikatana\

If it asks if you would like to overwrite any files, do so and overwrite the files. End result is that when Daikatana starts you can see in the right bottom corner of the red area in main menu “1.3” instead of “1.2”. You’re also able to access for example the HD resolutions from the Video menu.

If you start playing multiplayer with Daikatana community, you’re also going to need:

dkcustom.rar (Pak9)

You extract that package into:

C:\Program Files\Steam\steamapps\common\Daikatana\data\

 

And to further celebrate this awesome press day, I’ve purchased a limited number of steam keys, reply with a comment (be sure to include a working email address!) and I’ll send you a key!  That’s right it’s the:

ON SALE DAIKATANA GIVEAWAY!

*Quantities limited.

COMDEX/Fall’93 program & exhibits guide-on-disk

COMDEX/Fall’93 free diskette!

Comdex on a disk!

I saw this floating around on some web site… And I thought I’d take a look!  Well it’s exactly what it sounds like, an ancient MS-DOS text base database from the fine folks at Folio who would later on sell off, merge and become part of LexisNexis.

Folio infobase

And what fine things were there in 1993?

IBM Power Personal Systems

Let’s not forget the false hope and promise of the IBM/Apple/Motorola PowerPC that was going to save us all, and give us the grand unifying microkernel OS of them all, PINK.

The IBM Power Personal Systems Division is introducing and demonstrating technologies featured on its family of personal workstations.  The Personal Workstations marry  the high-performance PowerPC RISC microprocessor with industry-standard PC components.  The PowerPC is featured with new human interfaces, integration of multiple operating systems environments on a single platform, and the latest in operating system, multimedia and collaborative computing technologies.  OEMs, IHVs and ISVs can explore how they can use these technologies.

Yeah, as we all know Windows NT for the PowerPC wasn’t a thing until late 1995, then killed off in 1997, Solaris saw a single release, MacOS stayed hybrid 68000/PowerPC until the acquisition of NeXT, and then was the basis of Rhapsody/OS X 1.0 and then OS X 10.0 .  A/IX easily transitioned from the POWER to the PowerPC, while OS/2 only went as far as a limited beta, and PINK/Taligent just never happened.  Although thanks to hard ware assisted virtualization (VT-x/AMD-V) it really didn’t matter as we can run pretty much whatever OS we wish at pretty close to native speeds.  The line between Type-1 & Type-2 hypervisors has been blurred to the point of really not mattering anymore.

If anyone cares, I extracted the temperamental disk image as F93.ZIP

cisco router spotted in the wild with over 20 years uptime

On this thread on reddit, bhoskins has just posted screen shots of a cisco 2514 featuring 2 10mbit Ethernet ports, and 2 2Mbit Serial ports, and just over 20 years of uptime.

cisco 3000 router with 20 years of uptime

cisco 2514 router with 20 years of uptime

As bhoskins mentions later on in the thread:

I think i probably agree especially considering that’s monthly generator exercises that include transitions from commercial -> battery -> generator power and back.

However…The config… This routers goal in life is to provide management connectivity to some equally ancient SONET equipment that doesn’t even speak IP; it only knows CLNS. That’s right kiddos, it’s a hold over from a time long ago when dinosaurs roamed the earth and there was a competing protocol to IP.

So it runs CLNS and routes it with ISIS between the core and SONET ring. The level-2 database is close to 500 LSP and there are probably on the order of 800 CLNS routes. Oh yeah and it runs IP too so the router itself can be managed. All that with it’s little 608030 CPU and 16MB of memory. That fact that none of those processes have crapped on themselves in 20 years in a router with such limited resources is impressive to say the least.

Pretty amazing stuff.  And of course there was also that Netware server with 16 and a half years of uptime.  It’s amazing on one hand how this older stuff can keep on going, and how dangerous it is security wise to run such dated stuff.

16 and a half years of uptime

Gravity Rush 2 promo video for Hong Kong/Japan

Robert Heinlein?

Well probably not. While looking online for something I eventually fell through to youtube, and got this commercial for some new PS4 game. I thought it was kind of interesting. I guess there is something to be said of Asia for cats, tall buildings, and breaking the laws of physics, and bending gravity and all that.

While I do have a PS4 I really haven’t had time to really use it. And the Xbox ONE I do have ends up getting used to play… You Tube videos.