PCem networking update to build 335

Well after extensive testing of various CFLAGS settings it turns out that “-O2 -flto -ffast-math -mfpmath=387” gives the best overall settings for PCem.

So yeah me and leileilol went through a dozen+ iterations to arrive at this fun conclusion.

So I’ve only included 2 executables, a debug and the -O2 build.

You can download it here.

I haven’t made any changes to the networking code, and even with a LOT of fighting got OS/2 Warp 3.0 Connect to install.

Gopher

Gopher

Plus I fixed my gopher!

**EDIT

I made a mistake, and built both exe’s as debug.  I updated the archive, those who downloaded it, will want to do so again!

PCem networking update to build 334

You can download the build here: PCem-build-334-pcap-slirp.7z

This includes more different core binaries, and mostly fixes the NE2000 to no longer panic and fault out when something dumb tries to probe it, by writing the wrong values in the wrong places.

For the curious build 334 is right here.  We didn’t make the feature cut for version 10, so hopefully it’ll make 11.  I’ll provide an unofficial build once v10 is announced, along with hopefully better networking back end modules, expanding things from pcap & SLiRP.

More progress on PCem and networking

SLiRP tcp redirects now working

SLiRP tcp redirects now working

PCem is different from other emulators in that when it starts up, reboots it’ll tear itself apart, and re-kick all the components.  Normally other emulators do this once, and as a result I never noticed that slirp_exit doesn’t actually purge the socket state.  And calling the socket teardown call causes a mbuf explosion in the code.  Sadly GDB is pretty useless trying to debug it, since it’s claiming all the structure members don’t exist.  Very strange.

Luckily I could duplicate the debug feature to go though current socket redirects, and close the sockets on the Windows side with a simple closesocket.

In this version I’ve setup the following TCP port redirects:

ExternalPORT    Internal Port
42322                 22
42323                 23
42380                 80
42443                 443

I still haven’t messed with the rc file, so there is no GUI config, instead you have to do it in the text files.  I have some notes on the whole thing on the pcem forum here.

Download the executables and source here:

http://vpsland.superglobalmegacorp.com/install/pcem/PCem-0657320820ab-pcap-slirp.7z

And for those interested, the diff against mainline 328 is here.

Adding SLiRP to PCem

So PCem is an incredible emulator for the IBM PC platform.  One thing that has been missing, and really missed has been networking.  So a while ago, SA1988 came up with a patch that incorporated the BOCHS ne2k.cc into PCem.

So as requested, I took the copy of SLiRP I’ve used in SIMH, Cockatrice and Previous, and got it working in PCem.

Telnet

Telnet from MS-DOS

This has to be one of the easier ports since PCem doesn’t use threads.  But yes, it appears to work, although I haven’t done any major testing.

For those who want to experiment, here is a binary/source blob of the project.  Right now we are just past the OMG it compiled phase to OMG it SENT and RECEIVED data phase.

If anyone wants to play, the NE2000 is set to 0x300 IRQ 10.

And you need to manually add the following to your pcem.cfg file:

netinterface = 1
netcard = 1

And you should be good to go. I think.

QuakeWorld

QuakeWorld

And yes, it’ll run QuakeWorld!

Random links

No I’m not dead, just been busy.

But here is some interesting things I’ve seen the last while:

Infer: static code analysis from facebook of all people.  Supports C, Objective-C and Java.

Dr Jack Whitham’s blog, with some interesting stuff related to compiler optimizations and how they alter floating point results, along with ‘bug 323‘, and some DOOM fun!  Plus he has his updated source repositories online here.

And finally, Building A 10BASE5 “Thick ethernet” network.  A fun look at the first gen ethernet cabling on ‘slightly’ newer machines.

Porting Quake II to MS-DOS pt2

Continuing in this series on porting Quake II to MS-DOS, we get to touch some of the fun stuff.  The first big ‘fun’ thing is networking.

Now in my prior work with the MS-DOS version of Quake, I had used the WATTCP library to bring networking to the otherwise Windows/UNIX specific fun of network deathmatch back to MS-DOS.  Quake by default had support for the Beame & Whiteside’s TCP/IP stack which for all intents and purposes has vanished from the face of the Earth (does anyone have a copy?!).  So at the time, I thought it’d be cool to try to interface WATTCP with Quake, and it worked on the first attempt as WATTCP is a very competent TCP/IP stack.

So I took the Linux networking file net_udp, and compiled it, and I got an executable!

When it comes to testing WATTCP though, I prefer to use Qemu instead of DOSBox as it can not only emulate various network cards to which I can find packet drivers (yes even the evil PCI NE2000!) but it has a built in SLiRP network stack that let’s me NAT on my desktop without any crazy network configs.

And for the sake of testing, I setup a ‘null’ text mode server, figured out some flags, and I was able to connect!

Quake II for MS-DOS running on Qemu connected to a dedicated OS X server.

Quake II for MS-DOS running on Qemu connected to a dedicated OS X server.

Very exciting stuff indeed!

Now for some interesting stuff.  First I noticed that MS-DOS 5.00 with himem.sys is almost unplayable because it is so slow.  MS-DOS 4.01 without himem.sys is actually faster.  No, I’m not kidding.

Next is that some levels LOVE to gobble up RAM.  Maps like city1 will need at least 192MB of ram.  I haven’t even tried playing with the virtual memory of DJGPP, and I really don’t want to.  And let’s face if, if you even try to load Quake II on a MS-DOS machine, it better be a ‘big’ one.  This means you should be using the ‘dos’ from Windows 98, or perhaps FreeDOS, although I haven’t tested that at all.

So far from our limited testing the networking seems to be pretty good.   And at least that is one function we didn’t have to really pour a lot of effort into.  Although the payoff of being able to connect to servers on the LAN and even the internet is a good thing.

Continued in pt3, pt4, and part 5.

Previous 0.52 (trunk 391) + slirp

So I got this request to add in some SLiRP to Previous, the NeXT computer emulator.  Sadly work got in the way, and I trashed my windows dev machine.  To make it worse I also trashed my MacBook Air, but with a bit of screwing around I got X-code removed, and re-installed.

So Here is my wonderful work, some 50 lines of code + the SLiRP from Cockatrice all hacked up.

ICMP to 10.0.2.2 seems to work fine, UDP seems to not work, so no DNS.  I don’t know why either.  I can telnet to my BBS just fine, which is about all the testing I’ve done.

Previous to the BBS

Previous to the BBS

Inbound TCP seems to be broken too, but I could be initializing slirp_redirect incorrectly too.

In case you want to follow up on this the NeXT computer forums is the place to be.  Networking with NeXTSTEP is involved.

And for anyone who want’s my files, the source is here, and an OS X 10.10.3 binary is here.  Be sure to install the SDL2 framework ahead of time!

Getting Qemu’s NetWare 3.12 onto the LAN with Tun/Tap

I could also call this ‘going with the flow’… So instead of fighting the system, like I usually do today we are going to do things the way everyone else enjoys doing things, and that is building stuff with tun/tap and bridges.

YUCK.

Ok, so I’m using Windows, and that is what I’m assuming you are as well for this ‘guide’.

The first thing you’ll need is the tun/tap driver for Windows, and the easiest way to get that is via OpenVPN.  The next thing you’ll need is Qemu, again I’m just using the pre-compiled stuff right here.

Go ahead, and install them both.  With OpenVPN installed, when you open your control panel, and check out your network interfaces you’ll see something like this:

One NIC, One Tap

One NIC, One Tap

Good.

Now for my example, I’m going to add another TAP interface.  TAP’s are only good for a 1:1 relationship with the VMs.  Yes, that is why I prefer something else, but again we are going to do things today the way everyone else does them.

Now for me, I run the ‘addtap’ batch file located in the C:\Program Files\TAP-Windows\bin folder as Administrator, and this now gives me two TAP adapters.  I highly recommend disabling TCP/IP v4 and v6 on the TAP adapters, along with the MS client/server stuff.  We are only using these for bridging the VMs so we dont’ need the host computer to participate in this network.

Now for the fun part.  I’m assuming you have your NetWare server and client images all ready to go (I guess I can go over installation again some other day), and now we get to bind each one to a SINGLE TAP instance.  Also don’t forget that each machine needs a UNIQUE MAC address.  One of them can use the default settings, but the other one cannot.

I’m going to start my server like this:

\Progra~1\qemu\qemu-system-i386.exe -m 16 -hda netware312.disk -device ne2k_isa,netdev=usernet,mac=52:43:aa:00:00:11,irq=10,iobase=0x300 -netdev “tap,ifname=Local Area Connection 2,id=usernet”

As you can see, this gives me a NE2000 on port 0x300, IRQ 10 and sets the MAC address to 52:43:aa:00:00:11 .  And this sets it on the first TAP adapter, lovingly called “Local Area Connection 2″ because the primary adapter is called “Local Area Connection“.  Also take note of the quotes in this command line, as it’ll encapsulate the full default name of the TAP adapter.  The other alternative is to just rename the adapters, but where is the fun in that?

Now for my client:

\Program Files\qemu\qemu-system-i386.exe” -m 16 -hda client.disk -soundhw sb16,adlib,pcspk -device ne2k_isa,irq=10,iobase=0x300,netdev=usernet -netdev “tap,ifname=Local Area Connection 3,id=usernet”

As you can see the primary difference here is that it’s connected to “Local Area Connection 3” which is my second TAP interface.

Now with both virtual machines running the interfaces will turn on!

But as you’ll quickly discover, neither machine can talk to each-other, as they are islands so to speak.

Two virtual machines on islands.

Two virtual machines on islands.

Now for the fun part, we highlight the two TAP interfaces, right click, and turn on the built in bridge function of Windows!

highlight and select

highlight and select

And once that is done, a new Network Bridge interface will show up, transfer what layer 3 settings there are, and then setup the layer 2 bridge between the TAP interfaces.

Bridge activating...

Bridge activating…

And once the bridge interface has gone live, give spanning tree 15 seconds to do it’s thing, and YES you can now login to the NetWare server!

Logging in from the MS-DOS VM to the NetWare 3.12 VM

Logging in from the MS-DOS VM to the NetWare 3.12 VM

And there you go!  This is the ‘approved’ way to do virtual networking with Qemu.

Now I know what you are thinking, this is great for VM’s and all that jazz, but what if I say have an office FULL of old PC’s and I want them onto my new fangled ancient server?

No problem, right click on the bridge, and select delete.  This will put everything back the way it was, sending the VMs back to their own TAP interfaces.  Now select all the interfaces, and then setup a bridge (I suppose you could edit the existing one to include the physical interface…) and now once the bridge has been setup, it’ll now be talking out the local Ethernet interface.

One quick note, bridging and WiFi tend to not go hand in hand.  Some interfaces will work, but the rule seems to be the vast majority of setups will not.  So don’t complain if yours didn’t work, you are just part of the 99.99999%.  And if you did get yours to work, well good for you.

Novell Netware 3.12 once more runs on Qemu!

This version of Qemu seems to be one of the better ones in a LONG LONG time.

Netware 3.12

Netware 3.12

Much to my amazement, as I fully expected this to crash much like all the other versions, it actually runs.

qemu-system-i386.exe -m 16 -hda netware312.disk -device ne2k_isa,irq=10,iobase=0x300 -soundhw pcspk -serial none -parallel none -k en-us

I’m just more amazed it works.  Now I did try it on my old setup of a NE2000 on 0x300 Interrup 2/9 but I was getting some IRQ issues.  So I went ahead and reconfigured Netware for IRQ ‘A’, and set the CLI for 10. Of course I haven’t actually tested networking, this is really a ‘wow it did something’ statement.  No doubt I’ll have to build a new GNS3 test bed with this Qemu, and see how Netware performs.

shellinabox

So while browsing reddit, I came across this neat package, shellinabox.  Simply put, it runs as a process on your ‘box’ and fronts it with a javascript terminal interface.  So as long as you have a halfway modern machine with javascript support you too can just connect to a machine and run CLI based stuff.

BBS via telnet

BBS via telnet

So as a test I setup a game of tetris, and a telnet session to my BBS.

There isn’t much to ‘setup’ in the way of shellinabox, because it’s all command line driven.

/shellinabox-2.14/shellinaboxd -t -s /:LOGIN -s “/bbs:nobody:nogroup:/:/usr/bin/telnet localhost” -s /tetris:nobody:nogroup:/:/usr/games/tetris-bsd –css /shellinabox-2.14/shellinabox/white-on-black.css -b

So this will create a new web server that by default listens on TCP port 4200 which in turn uses the virtual directories / for a login, /bbs which launches telent, and /tetris which starts the BSD tetris for terminals game.  Now as many of you are aware, not all people with internet connections have the luxury of having all outbound TCP/IP ports. Even the most excellent flashterm still establishes a TCP session.  That is what makes this different is that all the traffic is done via HTTP, which means it can be proxied.  Now the real trick is having a web server do the proxing for you, so that all the user has to do is hit a special URL, and the server will proxy the request to shellinabox’s web server.

Enter Apache2’s reverse proxy!

So on my BBS’es apache config, I add in the following lines:

ProxyPass /tetris http://localhost:4200/tetris
ProxyPassReverse /tetris http://localhost:4200/tetris
ProxyPass /bbs http://localhost:4200/bbs
ProxyPassReverse /bbs http://localhost:4200/bbs

I’m not sure exactly of the specific modules to enable, but hammering away this got it to work:

a2enmod proxy
a2enmod mod_proxy
a2enmod rewrite
a2enmod mod_proxy
a2enmod proxy_http
a2enmod proxy_module
a2enmod headers
a2enmod deflate

Under my virtual server’s ‘root’ directory.  So now when you access http://bbs.superglobalmegacorp.com/tetris/ Apache will proxy your request into the shellinabox http server, and you’ll get…

Tetris

Tetris

So now only using HTTP you can play tetris!

So where to go from here?  I was thinking some kind of SIMH CP/M on demand thing.  There is a command line Wyse 60 emulator, so maybe that’d be fun.  I may even bring back something I had ages ago, access into a bunch of legacy systems.  This is a great ‘solution’ to enable multiplexing without having to use another software MUX.