Upgrading through OS/2; Version 3.0 aka Warp pt II

Continuing from my previous post, I scored a lot of OS/2 Warp 3.0 media on ebay, and a kind person sent me some disk images of Warp 3.0 blue spine!

Now the downside is that while Virtual PC 2007 supports XDF to some extent, it doesn’t like the XDF driver that comes with Warp 3.0… Which I guess isn’t a surprise, anyone would after all be loading the latest version, I mean who would load up and upgrade every version of OS/2 for the heck of it?

So as it is pointed out here, simply replace the ibm1flpy.add & xdfloppy.flt from OS/2 4.0 and it’ll work!

Now we get the usual, do we want to format my disk… As always the answer is NO… But it’s so delightfully colorful now!

Then it’s a simple matter of feeding it disks, and waiting for it to chew through the 6 disks…  I remember on a physical machine, these XDF’s weren’t exactly speedy.

And then with that out of the way, it’ll be time to reboot, into the GUI, and to see how much hardware (if any) has been preserved.

I had to change the Video to regular VGA, for some reason it this this is a Chips video…? And it had no idea about the CD-ROM.  It did pick up the sound blaster, and it kept my printer!

Wow fully loaded out, and 29.33MB.  I can’t remember the last time getting so much out of so little.  Anyways, time to swap more disks…

And as part of the update, it’ll let you compare your config.sys with a before and after… And honestly… WTF?  Since the lines are so long, why did someone thing this was actually legible?

I know it’s part of the legacy of config.sys, but really.. WTF!

Well we’ll just trust it’s upgrade process, and let it ride!

So we reboot, another splash logo and….

We not only get the desktop, the tutoral, Introducing OS/2.  Which is really nice looking.  It’s like they hired someone that’s not old school IBM to do this.  It’s at least a big enough of a change since the days of OS/2 1.2’s tutorial.

Closing that, I get the desktop.  I’m no fan of the launchpad, so I just shred that thing from the get go.  I know I know.. it’s like windows 95’ish but from 1994.

And how did my legacy applications hold up?

Bricks from OS/2 1.1 is still there, and still works great.  Word & Excel also working, just as they did when I installed them in OS/2 1.2.

Even SimCityLite is working, along with DOOM.  I’d have to give Warp an A+ on it’s migration from OS/2 2.1.  It did look a little scary with the config.sys thing from hell, but really you can tell a *LOT* of work went into this release of OS/2.

Speaking of games, Warp gave us.. Mahjongg Solitaire.  I don’t know why it’s not spelled Mahjong, maybe it’s some British English vs US English thing?  Anyways I’ve always associated the game with old ladies, and gambling rings.  Honestly IBM would have been better off paying out some developer for a ‘top selling game’ and doing an OS/2 version.  Even in OS/2 2.0 it is possible to write 32bit programs that’ll run in VGA 320x200x256 mode, which was still popular with plenty of the MS-DOS games of the time.  But I guess even a full screen port of DOOM wouldn’t be all that IBM GREY/PC/DULL enough.  Oh well even Tetris would have been a popular game.

One thing that bugged the hell out of me was the sounds.  It still was annoying to use OS/2 in an office with it constantly making noise… But in all fairness it was kind of the rage of the time, even Windows to this day has all the hooks in for it’s themes of custom mouse pointers, and GUI actions. Thankfully we’ve all moved beyond that.

This was going to be the the effort to really wow people before Windows 95 shipped.  In some regards it really was too little too late.  The world was shifting away from the idea of an isolate powerful ‘workstation’ to the connected computer.  As it does say on the box, this was the ‘on ramp to the information super highway.  In my opinion this is where OS/2 weakspots really started to show through.  First TCP/IP was an addon, not part of the OS.  I don’t know how they thought slapping other diskettes in the box is ‘ok’ but it’s not part of the default install, and easily missed by novice users.  The next, and forever lamented part is that it only included support for dialup.

That’s right, although dialup was pretty much the norm for 1994, the world was rapidly changing, and the first cable modems were starting to be slowly rolled out.  It also meant in the corporate world as LANS had taken over everything, and companies were just starting to think about TCP/IP and internet strategies, OS/2 was setup to be left out.  Instead, someone at IBM decided that LAN based network should be a premium and people should pay twice the price for OS/2 Warp connect.  This proved disastrous.

Right about this time, Microsoft had released Windows for Workgroups, which was all about LAN / NetBEUI access, but they even did throw out a free TCP/IP protocol upgrade.  Windows NT 3.1 had finally shipped, and it too included LAN TCP/IP support.  Then it was cemented in the more responsive Windows NT 3.5 which had a smaller memory footprint, and of course included support for PPP/SLIP along with LAN networking, and support for IP forwarding!  That’s right you could use Windows NT 3.5 as a router!.. (Yes, even the workstation version).

However IBM did at least have the foresight to include popular internet programs in their internet pack (which sadly I don’t have.  I’ll have to review it later), I recall it had a gopher client, NNTP client (Probably News/2 from the TCP/IP for OS/2 2.0 days) and a cut down version of LAMAIL…

The other massive shift online was the coming rise of the web browser.  Specifically Mosaic.  And Mosaic ran on all kinds of UNIX platforms.  It even ran on Windows NT.  They even made it ‘safe’ enough to run on Win32s.  But there was no port to OS/2.  Thankfully someone recognized the importance of Win32s, and provided a driver to interface Windows 3.1’s 386 enhanced mode, to a workalike driver for Win32s.

I chose the ‘runtime’ version of Win32s 1.1 .. I just wanted to see if it’d work.

And the good news is that not only did it work, but it runs in seamless mode, with OS/2 1.1’s color scheme.  Pretty snazzy.

There was a short windows, but it was there, while people were on dialup, and before Windows 95 had shipped and had some extended driver support under it’s belt, OS/2 was the best way to run Win32s stuff outside of Windows NT.  But even people who had devices like this thing I had at the time:

The web ramp was really cool, it had 3 serial ports, which let you connect 3 modems.  It would then round robin your outbound requests so that people could share all 3 lines (if you had them) and it did NAT in hardware.  This mean in the age of dialup this little guy would let you build a small LAN (it had a 4 port ethernet hub in the back) and suddenly all the computers at home with ethernet were online.  It’s stuff like this that really left people asking why did OS/2 warp have such a substandard networking stack.

The year was 1994, the internet was starting to gain momentum.  Windows 95 was a year and a half away.  The answer to Windows 95 would no doubt be OS/2 4.0.  Would IBM do anything about these shortcomings?

We’ll find out as we upgrade to ‘project Merlin’ AKA OS/2 4.0.

Win32s version tour…

Well I’ve managed to track down quite a few versions of Win32s from my various compiler CD’s So I figured it’d be somewhat interesting to run down a ‘tour’ of some of the significant versions starting with the first.

Now Microsoft Knowledge base article, KB121091 tells you which version of the win32s subsystem is installed by checking the win32s.ini or the version stamp of the WIN32S16.DLL file. Which for the most part is pretty simple. However the first version of Win32s that I could find doesn’t include either.

Win32s from October 1992.

I got this from the Windows NT October 1992 Win32 SDK. Keeping in mind that Windows 3.1 shipped in April of 1992 it’s kind of note worthy that already in October there is already a working win32s upgrade for Windows. I’d describe this release a a ‘core’ only version as all the win32s programs I have failed to run on this version. Mostly because this version lacks WINMM.DLL (the Multimedia library from NT), although the October 1992 Windows NT beta does include this dll, along with soundblaster/AdLib support!

Windows 3.1 - win32s 1992 running nt october 1992 appletts

Windows 3.1 – win32s 1992 running NT October 1992 applets

I was able to get a few of theapplets from Windows NT October 1992 running on this version of Win32s by simply expanding and copying them over.. The font selection for the digital clock was messed up, but the analog version worked fine. As you can see I got clock, freecell, notepad, solitaire and winver running. Needless to say the build 34326 is totally incorrect.

For anyone that wants to play with it, the 1992 version of Win32s is available here.

The next, and final beta from March of 1993. This one does identify itself as being build 61, which is not on the list.

Windows-3.1-win32s-March-1993-running-nt-october-1992-appletts

Windows 3.1 win32s from March 1993 running NT October 1992 applets

It’s compatibility is about par with the 1992 version, but the winver reports Windows NT version 63.10 … I’ve made it available here.

I was unable to find any 1.0 versions of Win32s. Googling around, it would appear that MathCad 4.0 shipped with the 1.0 runtime. If anyone has Mathcad 4.0 I’d love a copy of it’s Win32s 1.0!

From the same InfoWorld article, 1.1 shipped the same time as Windows NT 3.1, and 1.0 was another ‘pre-release’. But I do have to say that 1.1 includes quite a number of great utilities, and tools, unlike the other development versions.

Win32s 1.1

Win32s 1.1

Win32s 1.1 dev features

Win32s 1.1 dev features.

That’s right, this version includes the CLI Visual C++ compiler (Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 8.00), along with a profiler, and codeview debugger! Also included is a demo version of the Pharlap TNT Dos Extender, which is restricted to no user DLL’s and 2MB of RAM. Although if anyone really wants a kick ass Dos Extender, use the excellent, and FREE HX Dos Extender

Once WinG is installed, Lemmings will run on 1.1, while WinDoom fails because the procedure CreateDIBSection does not exist in this version of Win32s. Which really isn’t that surprising as version 1.1 is at parity with Windows NT 3.1, and that call didn’t get implemented until Windows NT 3.5 . Another fun thing is that because of the segmentation in Windows 3.1 it seems that a lot of stack ‘issues’ and other memory collisions are found much easier under Win32s then under Windows NT (and it’s siblings). At any rate, you can find this version of Win32s here.

Next is version 1.20 which includes support for OLE 2.0 . This brings Win32s up to the level of Windows NT 3.5 . And it allows more NT applications to run on Windows 3.1, including Word 6.0 for Windows NT. The development copy of Win32s 1.20 can be found here.

The developers version of 1.25 is on the Visual C++ 2.2 disc, but it lacks dev tools and debuggers from 1.10!  The retail copy of 1.25 with OLE2 support. There apparently was some major bugs with 1.25, and there is also the all important 1.25a update, which I’ve been able to track down both the retail and the retail + OLE2 versions. I don’t have any development versions of 1.25/1.25a so no debug symbols.

And finally I was able to track down Win32s 1.30a both retail OLE 2 & the development version, along with the final version of Win32s 1.30c, development and retail OLE 2.0.

Win32s 1.30 included a Windows 95 compatible help engine. I would imagine it included some level of compatibility for Windows 95 applications too.

Of all the versions, I’ve found that 1.25a is the most well behaved, but at the same time, I’m lacking the debug build of it… I should also point out gabby.de has a great info page on various applications that’ll run on Win32s.

Office 4.2 for Windows NT

At some time during the whole Windows NT vs OS/2 thing in the workplace, one of the funny things is that we all had to use Win16 versions of office, which I think we all agreed kind of sucked. Even at the time I thought it was rather sad that here is Microsoft pushing this new and exciting operating system, and the only applications that are available is a program to talk to mainframes (SNA Server), and a database (SQL Server). Oh sure there was MSMail, but there was no Word & Excel that the world was rapidly moving to, away from WordPerfect & 123.

So was I ever surprised to find out that there was a version of Microsoft Office for NT, and it at least ran on both i386 & Dec Alpha. The box claims that the PowerPC and MIPS versions will be along, but I don’t know if they ever shipped. But at the same time, it’d be hard to be touting these ‘advanced’ RISC CPU’s and all their glory, but when it comes to day to day work, they are running Word/Excel in emulation. I have the box with the coupon to redeem but I suspect MS would just laugh if I called them up asking for Word/Excel for the MIPS so I can run it on Qemu…. But I digress.

Naturally because of the day & age, the requirements are kind of laughable, but it was targeted towards Windows NT 3.5, with:

  • Microsoft Windows NT(tm) operating system 3.5 or later
  • 486 or higher
  • 16MB of memory
  • 59MB of disk space (minimum) 84MB maximum

So playing around with Win32s, I figured if i were to install say word into a VM, then xcopy it out, and try to run it, would it work? Win32s 1.10 wouldn’t run as this version didn’t include the new OLE 2.0 stuff… Which is why I suspect it won’t run on NT 3.1. Win32s 1.30c crashed and burnt in the worst way possible. Even Lemmings died on this version. damn.

But Win32s 1.25 actually ran it, along with Lemmings & Doom!

Word for NT on Windows 3.1

I can’t say it’s terribly useful, but considering how flakey Word 6.0 was on Windows 3.1, hell back in the day it’d been really nice to have a Win32 version.

Now I guess I ought to dig thru my stuff and see how many versions of both retail & debug Win32s I can find.

Lemmings demo for Win32s

Lemmings on Windows Vista

Lemmings on Windows Vista

While digging around I came across this demo of Lemmings for WinG/Win32s. And what’s great is that it runs on Windows 7 x86_64! Pretty snazzy!

The game play is still there, but the ‘speed up’ stuff is instant in the world of Ghz CPUs.

Oh well, it’s worth having some fun with. Here is the download.

I just remember this game when it was an Amiga thing…

WinDoom, WinG, Win32s on Windows 3.1 (on Qemu)

So since I was looking at the Doom stuff, I thought I’d try to track down the WinG version of Doom, and luckily someone pack ratted away two versions! Needless to say the older one didn’t work for me, but the last one, the April 13th, 1995 build, worked just great!

WinDoom on Windows 7 x64

Even on Windows 7 x86_64, sp1!

So how much of a chore was this to run back in 1995, before Windows 95?

Well to start WinDoom requires a display capable of at least 256 colors. I thought I’d use Qemu for this, but this proved to be… exceptionally difficult to locate a satisfactory display driver. I know lots of people point to the SVGA.EXE update from Microsoft, that uses VESA extensions to drive the video. Oh sure it sounds great but this is what I got:

And.. corruption.

Ok, so you say, there is this great patch to enable better VESA support right?

Wrong.

Yeah. I also hunted down various cirrus drivers for the specifically emulated chip (I checked the source) and they were all consistently defective. So I tried using a lower chip driver from HP and amazingly the 640x480x16MM colors works! (well, works ‘enough’).

Installing the right driver.

It’s the GD5430 v1.25f, 640x480x16.8M

The next thing is that Doom in both MS-DOS and Windows are full 32bit executables. On the MS-DOS side, it relies on the DOS4G/W extender. For Windows, it relies on the then new Win32 standard, and Windoom was written to conform to the Win32s standard, meaning with an addon it can run on Windows 3.1, Windows 95, And Windows NT. I just fished around the internet, and scored a copy of Win32s 1.25b . I just remember this being a somewhat stable version.

Installing Win32s

Win32s installs pretty smooth, (as long as you remember the share.exe). Now we just need the WinG runtime to be installed. WinG was Microsoft’s first real attempt at high speed gaming video under Windows. From what I understand it kind of went down because it was ‘too difficult’, and buying DirectX seemed to be a better fit.

Setting the midi mapper.

Another thing I’ve found is that if you change the midi mapper from the default “Ad Lib” to “Ad Lib general”, you can at least get the midi working in Doom.

Once WinG is installed, then it’ll want to do some blit tests…

WinG calibrating.

And after that, we can even bump it up to glorious 640×400, something the initial MS-DOS version couldn’t do easily as VESA wasn’t a big standard with INSTALLED cards at the time, and it’d require lots of work from the iD team, where the move to Windows pushed all the peripheral development to the Vendors to work around Microsoft. Even to this day, it’s still a big deal with video and audio.

One thing that is cool about Qemu is that at compile time, you can put in adlib & soundblaster cards to give the ‘full’ Windows 3.1 multimedia experience. There is also GUS (Gravis Ultra Sound) support
in Qemu, but I’ve never played with it..

With all of that out of the way, WinDoom will launch.

WING dispdib.dll missing error that turned out to be Video for Windows.

Then it’ll throw an error, because Windows 3.1 doesn’t have the same video backend as Windows NT 3.5 (and higher), hit ok and then …

And it works! WinGDoom running on Windows 3.1 on Qemu!

Sadly on Windows 3.1 the sound effects do not seem to work, but overall it’s a GREAT little port, mostly because as it comes up on 16 years old, it still works, and with sound. I wish other OS’s could give this kind of support for legacy applications, even ones that had such a brief window of support.

Anyone crazy enough to even think of playing along can download the blob of software I used to get this going here.

I should also add if you want sound effects to work on WinDOOM you really should install the Video for Windows Runtime, and it’ll work… poorly on Qemu/SoundBlaster 16, but it does work!

Twinsock and early windows internet usage

A friend of mine let me know that there is a current drive by former users of trumpet winsock to actually send the author the $25 ($35 in adjusted money) that he had asked for the shareware program. While I’ve seen Trumpet, it required a SLIP or PPP connection which I just didn’t have back in 1993/1994 timeline. Sure there was SLiRP, but it was far more involved to compile on the Ultrix machine university gave us access to, or the pay internet connection (sefl.satelnet.org!) that ran IRIX. So I ran Troy Rollo’s Twinsock.

Besides being GPL’d twinsock proxied the socket access from your Windows 3.1 computer, and ran the requests on the Unix host you connected to. The best part is that they didn’t have to know that you even ran it. Twinsock transformed the internet from being a Unix shell account that kept many people away, into a graphical experience with windows applications executing on our desktop. Since it wasn’t a real TCP/IP stack, it effectively firewalled us, and seeing we were running Windows 3.1 that was a good thing.

So to make this experence more… realistic, I took the 386BSD 0.1 image from sourceforge, and made one tweak into how it runs. I added the following to the Qemu execution:

-serial tcp:127.0.0.1:4445,server,nowait

Then I installed MS-DOS, Windows 3.1, a terminal program, and some tcp/ip programs to test into another Qemu virtual machine. I then connected the two Qemu instances like a null modem like this:

-serial tcp:127.0.0.1:4445

This way COM1 on both machines now talk together. The only major downside I’ve seen is that if the client VM is killed re-starting it doesn’t get the serial connection working, both VM’s have to be restarted from the command line.

The cool thing was I was able to use a dos terminal program and zmodem to transfer the source to 386BSD to build. Surprisingly this part went pretty smooth on all the versions of Twinsock that I tested, but version 1.3 and higher was the version that actually worked.

So with the executable built on the Unix machine, you launch the windows program, which included a minimal terminal program. And from there you can dial up, login to your Unix account, then launch the twinsock Unix component and the window minimizes and now you are ‘connected’.

Launching Twinsock

WinVN

One of the most popular programs & protocols of the “early” internet was NNTP or Net News. Net News transitioned the world from BBS’s and Forum Software. The topics were incredibly diverse, and the system was distributed by nature. And news traversed the internet in a semiquick fashion. Especially the nodes that had T1 or faster access at the time. Unlike down stream UUCP BBS’s that may only take a small feed once a day, now with Twinsock you could get whatever groups and feeds you wanted, and as fast as your little modem could download it.

So for this fun experiment, I downloaded a suitably old version of WinVN, 0.92.1. The first thing I went looking around for was a public NNTP server. A great resource for locating various news servers that have certain groups is newzbot.

So with a suitable server in hand, I was able to connect up and check a news group. It was slow and clunky like it was in the old days, but it was neat in that client server feel to know that it was running on my desktop.

MS Telnet

Naturally it wouldn’t be the internet if you still telneted all over the world for MUD’s, and even access to compilers, different systems, and school work. I had a chore of a time finding a ‘good’ telnet client, so I ended up settling with the one that Microsoft had released their own stack, ‘Wolverine’ as part of a TCP/IP protocol update for Windows for Workgroups. This stack was also significant in that this was the first time a ‘full’ and ‘real’ TCP/IP stack had been released for free. As mentioned above with Trumpet winsock, and the rest, you had to buy the network stack. This free stack was only meant for LAN access, though I’ve heard of people trying to hack PPP/SLIP stuff at the dos level, but again it wouldn’t help me, since I couldn’t SLiRP. But this was the forshadowing of how the internet was going to finally take off, and the short thriving window of 3rd party TCP/IP stacks for Windows was about to slam shut in the next release of Windows.

Mosaic 0.7

And finally we come the program that basically changed the way we do everything – Mosaic. The first web browser only worked on the NeXTSTEP, and I don’t think that Mosaic was the first PC browser, but at the time it certainly was the best. I loaded up an old version to see if it could at least hit a site by IP address, and it worked. Sadly downloading files causes the browser to crash. Mosaic was rather touchy back in the day too. Because Mosaic came from the Unix world of browsers it was a 32bit program, and needed large amounts of memory. It also was a large exe too, around 2MB! Which is far larger then doom & the dos extender! So Mosaic was the first program I can recall that needed the magical Win32s add on. I’ve mentioned Win32s before so I won’t go on and on, but like the TCP/IP from Microsoft, this also basically killed the DOS Extender market.

The first time I saw Mosaic, I was blown away, we left the world of terminals and archie/gopher/veronica to something you could use a mouse with, and enter in your own URL! It was amazing, but at the same time I thought the internet was doomed to failure as you had to READ. Oh how wrong I was to be shown later. But in the time between Windows NT 3.1 and Windows 95, there was a lot of reading expected to be done. Much like everyone at the time would reply with RTFM in the news groups for stupid questions, why there even was the “Big Dummies Guide to the Internet“, thankfully made available online, put on various shovelware CD’s and saved thanks to cd.textfiles.com.

I couldn’t get MiRC to work.. I forget what other IRC programs would actually work with Twinsock. But I didn’t spend that much time on IRC.

Oh well, that is how the internet stood in that pre Windows 95, pre wide scale PPP world. It really was amazing how fast things changed.

Minor SIMH fun

Well I updated the packages for SIMH last night, and I’ve included the win32s stuff and MS-DOS builds. This ought to allow some old schoole to have some fun!

The packages should be visable from here: https://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=154308&package_id=244756

I have also decided that the MS-DOS version (being the lowest common denominator) should include some kind of ‘sampler’ of OS’s so that you can see right out of the gate what simh is capable of. Naturally you can download the MS-DOS version, and simply replace the exe’s with stuff for windows/win32s/linux etc..

SIMH 3.8-0 for MS-DOS

This is a quick survey of SIMH 3.8-0 for MS-DOS. I’ve built these exe’s with Watcom C++ 11.0a.

You can break out of any of the simulators by pressing CONTROL+E.

All of the EXE’s are for the MS-DOS environment, and I’ve built them with DOS/4GW in mind. I will have to say that an initial test shows that running this stuff under a DPMI server like Windows or OS/2 provides better performance then native switching.. It could be my PC, however I’d recommend anyone who uses these EXE’s to try them natively and under Windows 3.1 at a minimum.. Because all of the MS-DOS nature of these programs, no disk files can be over 2 gigabytes. I don’t know if that’ll be an issue but of course you can have multiple files/partitions as I recall MS-DOS 5 having a 2 gigabyte file/partition size limit..

For anyone running this natively I have included only one copy of dos4gw.exe in the root of the zip.

1. Altair
2. Altair Z80
3. The HP2100
4. The Interdata 32b
5. The Nova
6. The PDP-11
7. The PDP-8
8. The MicroVAX II
9. The VAX 11/780

============================
1. Altair 8800
simh\altair\work

This is the Altair 8800 emulator with both AltairDOS and CP/M 2.2

Both CP/M and Altair DOS are from the file ceoaltair.zip

altdos.bat

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\altair\work>altdos
C:\simh\altair\work>altair.exe altdos.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

Altair 8800 simulator V3.8-0

MEMORY SIZE? 62
INTERRUPTS? n
HIGHEST DISK NUMBER? 1
HOW MANY DISK FILES? 5
HOW MANY RANDOM FILES? 4

055938 BYTES AVAILABLE
DOS MONITOR VER 1.0
COPYRIGHT 1977 BY MITS INC
.
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8< cpm.bat ——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\altair\work>cpm
C:\simh\altair\work>altair.exe cpm22.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

Altair 8800 simulator V3.8-0
62K CP/M VERSION 2.2 (ALTAIR 8800)
A>
Simulation stopped, PC: 172052 (JNC 172047)
sim> q
Goodbye
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8< ============================
2. The Altair 8800 z80 emulator.
simh\altairz8\work

This is more full featured then the other Altair emulator, and I’ve found the z80 to have more
software available. I’ve included the CP/M 2.2 that I found cpm2.zip

cpm2.bat

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\altairz8\work>cpm2
C:\simh\altairz8\work>altairz8.exe cpm2.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

Altair 8800 (Z80) simulator V3.8-0

64K CP/M Version 2.2 (SIMH ALTAIR 8800, BIOS V1.25, 2 HD, 15-Jan-07)

A>
Simulation stopped, PC: 0F3FA (RRA)
sim> q
Goodbye
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8< ============================
3. The HP2100 emulator.
simh\hp2100\work

I really don’t know much about this machine, but I included a way to run the basic1 program I
found online. It kind of reminds me of the ROMBASIC back ‘in the day’… It’s basic with line
numbers so I know it’s kind of old.. I really don’t know much otherwise about this machine.

basic1.bat

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\hp2100\work>basic1
C:\simh\hp2100\work>hp2100.exe basic1.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

HP 2100 simulator V3.8-0

READY

Simulation stopped, P: 17436 (JMP 17435)
sim> q
Goodbye
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
============================
4. The Interdata 32b emulator

simh\id32\unix6

Both of these unix’s were taken from the files iu6swre.zip and iu7swre.zip respectively.

This is research Unix v6 ported to the Interdata. I set the batch file to tell you how to
bootstrap the system, as it doesn’t just ‘turn on’.. Otherwise it should be comparable to Unix v6 on the PDP-11 or any other v6. This should be the first port of Unix outside of Western Electric. There is no halt/reboot/init 0, so I just sync the disk a few times, and then interrupt the emulator and quit.

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\id32\unix6\unixv6.bat
C:\simh\id32\unix6>id32.exe v6.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

Interdata 32b simulator V3.8-0
at the ? prompt type in:
unix
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

Interdata 32b simulator V3.8-0
v6.ini> d lfc tps 100
Read only argument
?unix
Memory = 182.50 K

login: root
You have mail.
# sync
# sync
# sync
#
Simulation stopped, PC: 2EB5C (EPSR R1,R0)
sim> q
Goodbye
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
simh\id32\unix7

This pretty much follows in the steps of the Unix v6 above. This is the research version of UNIX v7.

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\id32\unix7>unixv7.bat
At the : prompt type in
dsk(1,0)unix
ECHO is off.
Then at the # prompt hit CONTROL+D
the root password is root
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

Interdata 32b simulator V3.8-0

Boot
: dsk(1,0)unix
Memory = 248.0 K
# Restricted rights: Use, duplication, or disclosure is subject
to restrictions stated in your contracts with Western Electric
Company, Inc. and the University of Wollongong.
Fri Jan 2 18:15:04 EST 1970

login: root
Password:
# sync
# sync
# sync
#
Simulation stopped, PC: 00D20 (EPSR R1,R0)
sim> q
Goodbye
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8< ============================
5. The Nova emulator

simh\nova\work

This is RDOS V7.50, which I honestly don’t know anything about… I retrieved this OS from the archive rdosswre.tgz .

rdos.bat

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\nova\work>nova.exe rdos.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

NOVA simulator V3.8-0

Filename?

NOVA RDOS Rev 7.50
Date (m/d/y) ? 10/31/77
Time (h:m:s) ? 10:10:00

R
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
============================
6. The PDP-11 Emulator

simh\pdp11\unixv1

This is the Unix v1 restoration project’s latest disk image, that I have retrieved from
http://code.google.com/p/unix-jun72/
Being one of the first versions of Unix it’s super primitive, however I thought it was interesting to include in this SIMH sampler to see just how far UNIX has progressed, and just how much is the same.

unixv1.bat

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\pdp11\unixv1>unixv1.bat
C:\simh\pdp11\unixv1>pdp11 simh.cfg
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

PDP-11 simulator V3.8-0
Disabling CR
Disabling XQ
RF: buffering file in memory
TC0: 16b format, buffering file in memory
simh.cfg> att dci 5555
File open error

:login: root
root
#
Simulation stopped, PC: 007332 (MOV (SP)+,25244)
sim> q
Goodbye
RF: writing buffer to file
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
============================
7. The PDP-8 Emulator

simh\pdp8\work

This is the PDP-8 emulator with OS8. I really don’t know anything about this other then the
‘list’ command… I retrieved this from the file os8swre.tgz .

os8.bat

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\pdp8\work>os8
C:\simh\pdp8\work>pdp8 os8.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

PDP-8 simulator V3.8-0
RX: buffering file in memory

.
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
============================
8. The MicroVAX II Emulator

simh\vax\quas

This is the MicroVAX II emulator with a miniroot of Quasijarus 0c. It’s not exactly fully functional in this state, but it’s enough to exercise the emulator, and boot up from disk.
I’ve configured the NVram so it will just boot up by default. I have left the installation tape image as quas.tap. Please note that this is *NOT* enough for a full install, this is just a demo to check that your system works.

quas.bat

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\vax\quas>vax.exe quas.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

VAX simulator V3.8-0
NVR: buffering file in memory
Loading boot code from ka655x.bin

KA655-B V5.3, VMB 2.7
Performing normal system tests.
40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..
24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..
08..07..06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
Loading system software.
(BOOT/R5:0 DUA0

2..
-DUA0
1..0..

loading boot

Boot
: /vmunix
326312+104440+130352 start 0x23b8
4.3 BSD Quasijarus UNIX #3: Sat Feb 14 20:31:03 PST 2004
root@luthien.Harhan.ORG:/nbsd/usr/src/sys/GENERIC
real mem = 33521664
SYSPTSIZE limits number of buffers to 80
avail mem = 31697920
using 80 buffers containing 655360 bytes of memory
MicroVAX 3000, ucode rev 6
uda0 at uba0 csr 172150 vec 774, ipl 15
uda0: version 3 model 3
uda0: DMA burst size set to 4
ra0 at uda0 slave 0: ra81, size = 891072 sectors
dz0 at uba0 csr 160100 vec 300, ipl 15
dz1 at uba0 csr 160110 vec 310, ipl 15
dz2 at uba0 csr 160120 vec 320, ipl 15
dz3 at uba0 csr 160130 vec 330, ipl 15
Changing root device to ra0a
Automatic reboot in progress…
Tue Feb 3 17:52:10 PST 2004
Can’t open checklist file: /etc/fstab
Automatic reboot failed… help!
erase ^?, kill ^U, intr ^C
# sync
# sync
# sync
#
Simulation stopped, PC: 800029AF (BNEQ 800029C6)
Goodbye
NVR: writing buffer to file
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
============================
9. The VAX 11/780 Emulator

simh\vax780\work

The VAX 11/780 is a bit weird in that it cannot run it’s vmb.exe directly, unlike how the
MicrovaxII can run its ROM. I’ve been using extracted boot code to get the 11/780 to run. Again because I’m more familiar with Unix, I chose to include BSD 4.2’s miniroot to test functionality. This is really only suitable for testing the emulator out. I extracted the file bootra from the source code, and I took the miniroot file from the tape.

bsd42.bat

——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8<
C:\simh\vax780\work>bsd42
C:\simh\vax780\work>vax780.exe bsd42.ini
DOS/4GW Protected Mode Run-time Version 1.97
Copyright (c) Rational Systems, Inc. 1990-1994

VAX780 simulator V3.8-0
loading ra(0,0)boot
Boot
: ra(0,0)vmunix
199488+
4.2 BSD UNIX #9: Wed Nov 2 16:00:29 PST 1983
real mem = 8384512
avail mem = 7073792
using 102 buffers containing 835584 bytes of memory
mcr0 at tr1
mcr1 at tr2
uba0 at tr3
hk0 at uba0 csr 177440 vec 210, ipl 15
rk0 at hk0 slave 0
rk1 at hk0 slave 1
uda0 at uba0 csr 172150 vec 774, ipl 15
ra0 at uda0 slave 0
ra1 at uda0 slave 1
zs0 at uba0 csr 172520 vec 224, ipl 15
ts0 at zs0 slave 0
dz0 at uba0 csr 160100 vec 300, ipl 15
dz1 at uba0 csr 160110 vec 310, ipl 15
dz2 at uba0 csr 160120 vec 320, ipl 15
dz3 at uba0 csr 160130 vec 330, ipl 15
root on ra0
WARNING: should run interleaved swap with >= 2Mb
erase ^?, kill ^U, intr ^C
# sync
# sync
# sync
#
Simulation stopped, PC: 8000162E (BRB 80001620)
Goodbye
——8<------8<------8<------8<------8<------8< The entire source is in the ‘source’ directory with projects for all of the SIMH material.
There are a few emulators that *WILL NOT BUILD* for MS-DOS because of a lack of 64bit integers. I suppose if there is any call for the missing emulators with the DJGPP compiler, assuming that it contains 64bit integer support. It’s completely unverified on my part. I’ve also done some preliminary work on networking with packet network drivers, however I am experiencing some weird timeouts. It’s hard to track down at the moment, but I’ll keep plugging away.

I don’t think there is any reason why you would not be able to use OpenWATCOM to build these files.

Fun with Win32s!

Well I planned on doing an update, but I didn’t get around to it. I’ll post my fun thru dec alpha fun later.
In the meantime, I was combing ebay, and I saw a cheap copy of Watcom C++ version 11. Now back in college I had 10.0, and it was AWESOME! It does 16bit & 32bit development of OS/2 MS-DOS and even Windows… For some reason the guy who sold the Watcom 11 included some techsupport thing he had going on, and included a tidbit about their being a ‘Default-windows application [-bw]’ (it’s on page 7 of C compiler settings) and it’s like the old Borland C++ for windows, or QuickC for windows days… It’s too bad I never knew it was there, as it allows for easy text mode stuff to win32 enviroments like … Win32s.
Now Win32s was one of those funny things, in which some smart people noticed that for the most part the ‘core’ of Win32 was a superset of Win16, and all they needed to do was hook the program loader, load the win32 exe into a relocatable space, then thunk all the win32 calls into win16 calls allowing a bunch of win32 applications to run on Windows 3.1! This was somewhat popular as most peoples machines at the time were not powerfull enough to run Windows NT 3.1, or they simply wished not to. And Windows 95 was going to be nearly another 2 years away…
Anyways, I’ve always thought SIMH was cool in that it’s super portable, so spending 20 minutes clearing out the ‘win32 console’ specific stuff from the code, I was able to build up a version that not only runs on Win32s on Windows 3.1, but also supports the TCP/IP remote console.
Here is a screen shot of my Windows 3.1 running under Virtual PC, telnetted to itself running the simh microvax running VMS 4.7

A Win32s VAX!

Anyways it’s too little too late, but I think it’s still cool. The neat thing about this is since it’ll run on Win32s is that it’ll run on dammed near any emulator as it’ll conform to such a subset.. Or so I’m hoping. I imagine it should also run under OS/2 3.0’s win32s emulation as well… And yes I’ve tested it with Win32s 1.25a that’s before Microsoft ‘fixed’ it to break all the OS/2 users out there…