SQL Server 2000 on Windows 10

I have to admit it, that when I first heard about this I was HIGHLY skeptical, but sure enough it actually works.

Enterprise Manager looking at the infamous PUBS database

Although I have gotten SQL Server 4.21a & 6.5 running on Windows 10 (The core from 6.0 works, but it’s pre-release COM objects for the Enterprise manager don’t like Windows 10) There were two stumbling blocks I never could get around.  The first one turned out to be something trivial, which is SQL 4.21 would never listen on TCPIP.

Fixing SQL 4.21

It turns out that this actually was a simple fix.

17/09/21 19:40:24.00 server server name is ‘JADERABBIT’
17/09/21 19:40:24.00 server Recovering database ‘model’
17/09/21 19:40:24.00 server Recovery dbid 3 ckpt (45,26)
17/09/21 19:40:24.00 server Clearing temp db
17/09/21 19:40:24.03 kernel Using ‘SQLEVENT.DLL’ version ‘4.21.00’.
17/09/21 19:40:24.83 kernel Using ‘OPENDSNT.DLL’ version ‘4.21.09.02’.
17/09/21 19:40:24.83 kernel Using ‘NTWDBLIB.DLL’ version ‘4.21.00’.
17/09/21 19:40:24.83 ods Using ‘SSNMPNTW.DLL’ version ‘4.21.0.0’ to listen on ‘\\.\pipe\sql\query’.
17/09/21 19:40:24.83 ods Using ‘SSMSSOCN.DLL’ version ‘4.21.0.0’ to listen on ‘1433’.
17/09/21 19:40:26.04 server Recovering database ‘pubs’
17/09/21 19:40:26.06 server Recovery dbid 4 ckpt (469,25)
17/09/21 19:40:26.06 server Recovering database ‘ultimate’
17/09/21 19:40:26.06 server Recovery dbid 5 ckpt (524295,12)
17/09/21 19:40:26.06 server Recovery complete.
17/09/21 19:40:26.12 server SQL Server’s default sort order is:
17/09/21 19:40:26.12 server ‘bin_cp850’ (ID = 40)
17/09/21 19:40:26.12 server on top of default character set:
17/09/21 19:40:26.12 server ‘cp850’ (ID = 2)

The DLL for TCP/IP is SSMSSOCN.DLL, and it turns out it really wants to be located in the C:\Windows\SysWOW64 directory (aka the system path for libraries).  Well that’s all great now, isn’t it?

Not really.

ODBC Hell

The ODBC drivers in Windows 10 finally made a magical cut off point that they will not talk to any old and ‘vulnerable’ SQL Servers.  This means that the oldest version you can connect to is SQL Server 2000.  Even SQL 7 didn’t make the cut.  Trying to connect to a SQL 7 server, you just get:

Attempting connection
[Microsoft][ODBC SQL Server Driver]Cannot generate SSPI context

And then I saw this post, about using FreeTDS to connect to MSSQL.  So I followed their instructions, and got nowhere fast just lots of crashing.  Turns out the bloodshed environment’s included G++ just fails 100% of the time for me, with a nice crash.  So I pointed it to the TDM GCC install, and then had to link the DLL manually and… nothing.  No configuration point.  In a fit of rage, I took the exist msvc project, opened it in Visual Studio 2015, and built it, except for one issue…

odbccp32.lib(dllload.obj) : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol __vsnwprintf_s referenced in function _StringCchPrintfW

Seriously, it turns out that 2015 can’t just link to ODBC, that the libc thing that gave me SDL grief is deeply entrenched all over the place.  So in this case you need to link against legacy_stdio_definitions.lib. Fantastic.

I get my DLL, and yes, it’s a Windows 32bit ODBC driver!

FreeTDS Access failure

And yeah, lots of failure.

A red-herring was seeing this in the trace:

net.c:741:Sending packet
0000 01 01 00 2b 00 00 00 00-53 45 4c 45 43 54 20 43 |…+…. SELECT C|
0010 6f 6e 66 69 67 2c 20 6e-56 61 6c 75 65 20 46 52 |onfig, n Value FR|
0020 4f 4d 20 4d 53 79 73 43-6f 6e 66 |OM MSysC onf|

So I was thinking that SQL 4.21 & 6.5 are just too old to have this weird table, and as mentioned over here people would just create it, to get Access to shut up, and get on with their lives.

So, I put in some SQL

CREATE TABLE MSysConf(CREATE TABLE MSysConf(Config   int NOT NULL,chValue  char(255) NULL,nValue   int NULL,Comments char(255) NULL)
GO
INSERT INTO MSysConf(Config,nValue,Comments)VALUES(101,1,’Prevent storage of the logon ID and password in linked tables.’)
GO

And yes, it creates the table, Access get’s it’s result then obviously doesn’t like it and up and dies.  Maybe I can burn more cycles on it later, or break down and ask.

SQL Server 2000 (Dev) on Windows 10

And then I saw this epic thread, Windows 10 & My SQL Server 2000 Personal.

I managed to install following these steps:

Extract SP4
Copy ..SP4\x86\other\sqlredis.exe to ..\originalinstallpath\x86\other
(this avoid mdac insall freezing)
Create this folder structure (any place):
Microsoft SQL Server\80\Tools\Binn
Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL\Binn
Find out sqlunirl.dll on SP4 path and copy to Binn folder above
Copy dll files on ..SP4\x86\setup to Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL\Binn (folder above)
Copy folder structure (created on step 3) to C:\Program Files (x86)
Give full access to user logged to **Microsoft SQL Server** folder
Change install compatiblity ..\originalinstallpath\x86\setup\setupsql.exe
XP SP2
Run as administrator

Could that really be it?  For some reason I had a file held in the Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Control\Session Manager\PendingFileRenameOperations registry key, preventing me from installing, but zapping the key & stub program, and I was able to follow the steps (I’m still not sure if you copy the dlls into the MSSQL\Binn or Tools\BInn directories, so I copied them to both!) and yes, it worked.  I even could run the SP4 update.

And now I can use Access 2016 with this fine ancient database.

Access 2016 with SQL 2000 via ODBC

And here we are.  As always there is no larger over reaching point to this.  I did have to create a linked SQL login for myself to get ODBC to login properly but it’s somewhat simple, and honestly if that sounds bizarre to you, why are you even thinking about something like this?

For me, I’m interested in the DTS of all things.  Sure the new ones are fancier, and all that jazz, but I paid good money back in the day for old MS dev tools, and being able to use them without any virtualization, aka running on bare iron is all the more appealing.

26th anniversary of Linux!

As the joke goes:

Happy 25th birthday, Linux! Here’s your f-ing cake, go ahead and compile it yourself.

So it’s always a fun time for me to push my old project Ancient Linux on Windows.  And what makes this so special?  Well it’s a cross compiler for the ancient Linux kernels, along with source to the kernels so you can easily edit, compile and run early Linux from Windows!

As always the kernels I have built and done super basic testing on are:

  • linux-0.10
  • linux-0.11
  • linux-0.12
  • linux-0.95c+
  • linux-0.96c
  • linux-0.97.6
  • linux-0.98.6

All of these are a.out kernels, like things were back in the old days.  You can edit stuff in notepad if you so wish, or any other editor.  A MSYS environment is included, so you can just type in ‘make’ and a kernel can be built, and it also can be tested in the included Qemu.  I’ve updated a few things, first with better environment variables, and only tested on Windows 10.  Although building a standalone linux EXE still requires a bit of work, it isn’t my goal here as this whole thing is instead geared around building kernels from source.  I included bison in this build, so more of GCC is generated on the host.  Not that I think it matters too much, although it ended up being an issue doing DooM on GCC 1.39.

So for people who want to relive the good old bad days of Linux, and want to do so from the comfort of Windows, this is your chance!


Download Ancient Linux on Windows
Download Ancient Linux on Windows

Setting up Windows environment variables for DJGPP (& other GCC based compilers)

DJGPP & other compilers, such as EMX require that you set needed variables with a UNIX style slash convention.  Also it is a pain to hard code the entire path into a command shell.  I know this works on Windows 10, although I’m not sure about earlier versions.

The %cd% variable contains the current directory, so it makes it easy to do something like this:

@echo.
@set tmpdir=%cd%\tmp
@set path=%cd%\bin;%PATH%
@set C_INCLUDE_PATH=%cd%\include
@set _LIBRARY_PATH=%cd%\lib
@echo.
@echo finished.

Which is great, but of course all the paths are MS-DOS style.  There now is the ability to replace strings!

@set _tmpdir=%cd%\tmp
@set tmpdir=%_tmpdir:\=/%
@set _tmpdir=

So in this example I set a temporary variable to the MS-DOS style path, and then using the pattern :(match)=(replace) it will then replace \ with /, giving me the UNIX style path.  I then just set _tmpdir to nothing, unsetting the variable.  So this way I don’t have to hard code any paths, and I can flip the slashes as needed.

Another fun thing is you can do logic blocks..  A simple one if a file doesn’t exist then compile it:

IF NOT EXIST dhyrst. (
echo.
echo Executable missing attempting to compile….
@make -f makefile
echo.
)

I’m sure most people knew about this, but for an old guy used to doing things the hard way, it was nice to see that there finally was some way to do this kind of thing.

SQL Server 6.5 on Windows 10 x64

SQL Server 6.5 running on Windows 10

In the same effort as getting SQL Server 4.21a running on Windows 10, I found that SQL Server 6.5 will run as well.  For what it’s worth, SQL Server 6.0 runs, but the enterprise manger will not run, giving this fun error:

sdf

The SQLOLE OLE object could not be registered.

And SQL 7.0 just bombs out with this:

x

Your SQL Server installation is either corrupt or has been tampered with (unknown package id).

Which clearly means I’m missing something in trying to transplant settings.  However for some reason SQL 6.5 I can register the SQLOLE type, and boom!

SQL 6.5 in action

SQL Server 6.5 running on Windows 10

SQL Server 6.5 running on Windows 10

On Win64 vs Win32 and COM objects

I should mention that when registering a COM object you typically run something like this:

regsvr32.exe \mssql\binn\SQLOLE65.DLL

Which picks up the one in the default path.  What about system32?

%SYSTEMROOT%\system32\regsvr32.exe \mssql\binn\SQLOLE65.DLL

Well it turns out that this ‘system32’ directory is actually the 64bit system directory!  And attempting to do this will just result in the error:

64bit regsvr32 on a 32bit COM object

64bit regsvr32 on a 32bit COM object

The module was loaded but the call to DllRegisterServer failed with the code 0x80040005. Well great.  This typically goes back to a permissions issue, or the wrong regsvr32.exe being called.

However on a Win64 based OS, you actually need to specify the Win32 version of regsvr32 which actually lives in the SysWOW64 directory, and run the command prompt at administrator!  So you would run it like this:

%SYSTEMROOT%\SysWOW64\regsvr32.exe \mssql\binn\SQLOLE65.DLL

And you should get:

adf

32bit regsvr32 working

With this COM object registered, you can now launch the Enterprise manager!

Also I found a semi fun way to rename the SQL server:

sp_configure ‘allow updates’, 1
go
reconfigure with override
go
delete sysservers
go
sp_addserver YOURSERVERNAME,local
go
shutdown
go

Running this and it renamed the local SQL instance, and shut it down.  Restarting and it connected to itself just fine.  Naturally change YOURSERVERNAME to whatever your hostname is.  SQL server always wants to be called whatever the actual hostname is, otherwise things break in strange and confusing ways.

Thoughts

Is this terribly useful?  Probably not.  But I think it’s kind of interesting to run 90’s era server software in the 21st century.  Sure I wouldn’t want to run any of it in any type of production environment, but it shows at it’s core how Win32 has not drifted.  However looking at the Microsoft Management console of SQL Server 7.0, and how it will not either run on Windows 10, nor will the snapin run show just how fragile the house of COM turned out to be, and meanwhile good old fashioned Sybase/Win32  code still runs from 1993 onward.

I suppose the next thing to do is to try it on Wine, or a fun enough debugger/syscall trace to see what on earth SQL 7.0’s problem is.  I don’t have any doubt that it’s nothing that can’t be fixed, although back to the root point, would you really want SQL 7.0 in 2016… or even SQL 2000 for that matter.

SQL Server 4.21a on Windows 10 x64

SQL Server 4.21a!

SQL Server 4.21a!

It’s been 7 YEARS, since I last took the SQL Server 4.21a plunge by getting it running on Windows Vista.  I was thinking with all this Windows NT 3.1 fun, I should get SQL Server 4.21a up and running on my current Windows 10 machine.  However this proved more involved.

Unlike Windows Vista, the setupdll.dll from Windows NT 4.0 will not work.  I used the one from Windows NT 3.1, and it will run the setup program fine, but the file copy bombs out.  I went crazy and modified the setup.inf to not actually copy files, take an xcopy of the raw files from an old install, and it won’t even try to install the service, it just builds a master database, and exits.

Trying to run the SQL Server directly, and you get this fun error:

16/10/13 21:19:08.40 kernel   Unable to start due to invalid serial number.

Well isn’t that great.  So naturally you either have to install it, or just import an existing registry key setup like this SQL.REG file.

If you are so inclined, you can even remove named pipe support, and have it listen only on TCP/IP.  Or the other way around.  Or even change the TCP port.

In the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SQLServer\Server key there should be a Multi-String key called ListenOn … and it’s just the network transport DLL, and how they listen.  As you can see SSNMPNTW is the named pipe transport, and SSMSSOCN is the TCP/IP transport.

ListenOn key

ListenOn key

However it’s not terribly useful as it turns out that master database is actually empty.  So without stored procedures or much of anything you really can’t do anything with it.  However looking at the install directory there is a bunch of SQL scripts.  Even better on the VM where I’ve installed it, there is some output files, that by their date & time tell me in what order to run them!

First things first, I copy the following files from the C:\SQL\DLL diredctory to the C:\SQL\BINN directory so I don’t have to mess with paths:

NTWDBLIB.DLL
OPENDSNT.DLL
SQLEVENT.DLL
SQLTL32.DLL
SSNMPNTW.DLL
SSMSSOCN.DLL

Now I can run the SQL server from the C:\SQL\BINN directory

START SQLSERVR.EXE

And now it’s running.  If there is any issues, or your master database is either damaged, or just plain doesn’t exist, you can create one with the BLDMASTR.EXE program.

C:\sql\BINN>BLDMASTR.EXE
Buildmaster 4.20a NT : Wed Jan 26 12:37:00 1994

Master disk name? (default is master.dat) :

Master disk size (in 2k blocks)? (default is 6144) :

Configuration only? (default is N) (y or n) : n

Databases only? (default is N) (y or n) : n
Master device: master.dat
writing configuration area
writing the MASTER database
writing the MODEL database
writing allocation pages for remaining 7 MB, (3584 pages)
7 MB
Buildmaster complete

It’s that simple!  Move the master.dat file into the C:\SQL\DATA directory and if the server doesn’t find it by itself, you can just tell it where it’s located:

START SQLSERVR.EXE -d ..\DATA\master.dat

And it should start.

Now the file CONFIG.SQL needs to be modifed (if you have a prior config) or created.

The two key lines are:

update master.dbo.sysdevices set phyname=’C:\SQL\DATA\MASTER.DAT’ where name = ‘master’
sp_addserver YOURMACHINE,local

Which as you can imagine simply sets where the master database lives, and what the machine name is, as SQL server LOVES to know the correct machine name.  With that done, here is my simple script for populating the master database:

CHARSET.EXE /S . CP437\noaccent.437
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\INSTMSTR.SQL
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\INSTNT.SQL
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\INSTMODL.SQL
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\INSTCAT.SQL
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\CONFIG.SQL
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\INSTPUBS.SQL
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\ADMIN2.SQL
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\OBJECT2.SQL
isql -Usa -P < ..\INSTALL\HELPSQL.SQL

And once this has finished it will have populated all the tables in your master database.  Hit CTRL+C in the SQL Server window, and it’ll shut down. Re-launch it, and it’ll be initialized.

Assuming this all went according to plan, you can now launch SQLADMIN, the SQL Administrator, and then you can get a connect screen like this (I only got it running with the named pipes transport…)

SQL Admin connect

SQL Admin connect

Remember by default the sa user has no password!

SQL Administrator

SQL Administrator

And we are good to go!  Feel free to grab SP4, and apply it by unzipping, and copying the files & dll’s to their respective places.  So there we go, from January of 1994, to October of 2016, SQL Server still running!

MIDI Mayhem on Windows 10

So I know it’s ‘probably’ the super cheap generic USB to MIDI dongal I got on the cheap, but it just doesn’t work on Windows 10.

Using DOSBox, I get the following output when cycling between devices on the console:

MIDI:Opened device:win32
MIDI:win32 selected Microsoft GS Wavetable Synth
MIDI:Opened device:win32
MIDI:win32 selected USB2.0-MIDI
MIDI:Opened device:none
MIDI:win32 selected MIDIOUT2 (USB2.0-MIDI)
MIDI:Opened device:none

As you can see it clearly can see the USB device, but when it opens the device it fails. And yes I’ve tried Administrator.  And for the hell of it, I fire up Windows XP on VMWare, connect the USB dongal, and amazingly:

MIDI:Opened device:win32
MIDI:win32 selected USB Audio Device
MIDI:Opened device:win32
MIDI:win32 selected USB Audio Device [2]
MIDI:Opened device:win32
MIDI:win32 selected Microsoft GS Wavetable SW Synth
MIDI:Opened device:win32

Yes, I can open the out port just fine.  So now I run a virtualizer to run my emulator to drive a physical peripheral… Ugh.  Has MIDI been this messed up all along and I never noticed?

Oh yeah, the GS Wavetable Synth works fine, as did MUNT before I uninstalled it, thinking it was somehow interfering with anything.

I know I’m using this fine device, the QinHeng USB MIDI adapter, which apparently is notorious crap, but my recently acquired Yamaha MU 80, works fine with it on Windows XP.

QinHeng USB MIDI adapter

QinHeng USB MIDI adapter

Ugh.

Updated build of Linux 0.11 on Windows 10

Building & Running Linux

Building & Running Linux

I’ve updated my project for compiling Linux 0.11 on Windows 10.  In this version it builds a lot better with TDM MinGW 5.1.0 + MSYS.

The big improvements is that you can compile Linux without the full MinGW/MSYS install by running the ‘blind’ script which will compile the kernel without make and friends.

The build process for the kernel works as well so now with the included Qemu 0.12.5, no need to link under Linux anymore.  I fixed up some of the build processes as I thought I’d re-build and some stuff bombed so it’s all fixed up.

For those interested, I just updated the original download here:

MinGW-aout-linux-011.7z

Qemu 2.4.0.1 binaries for Windows

So here is my cross compiled Qemu binaries for Windows.

I added in my Control+Alt+d ‘fix’ to be a Control+Alt+Delete that anyone who runs Windows NT or MS-DOS will no doubt love.  The kbd_put_keycode function had been removed, so I also put that back in.

I also undid the weird scaling thing that has been around since version 1.1.  And I tried my best to merge in some NE2000 fixes.

Solaris 9

Solaris 9

I threw a Solaris 9 ISO at it, and it booted up to the text installer!

asd

MIPS ARC

The MIPS ARC firmware however always bombs out on reset with an Interrupt Controller Error.

I tried the ‘doom’ test, and installing DooM 1.1 took FOREVER.  Writing to the disk is slow. Incredibly slow. I guess forcing the write thru cache is mandatory?

-drive file=bla.disk,if=ide,index=0,media=disk,cache=writethrough

I haven’t tested.

Also DO NOT USE THE PCSPEAKER DEVICE.

I nearly went deaf.  It doesn’t work properly, but rather loops so that one beep turns into a hurricane of beeps.

I’ve included the needed DLL’s, and compiled everything I could statically.  I guess I could have fought more but I have other things to do.

So the ‘cut down’ version which is i386/x86_64 only is HERE.

Those who want to try out the various RISC processors download the ‘full’ package HERE.

Failure to upgrade to Windows 10

It’s been a bad hardware day for me, my MacBook Air that I bought in 2012 stopped working.  And it’ll cost at least half the price of a new one to fix it.  So instead of that I don’t want to spend that much right now so I picked up a cheap used Fujitsu laptop.  It had Windows 7 on it, which qualifies for Windows 10, so I figured I’d just use that free upgrade!

Wow that was a whole day shot by.  Although now that I’m posting this from Windows 10, it is much more faster and responsive than Windows 7.

The first big problem I had was that this laptop didn’t have *ANY* updates installed.  Service pack 1 for Windows 7 is required for the upgrade, and that is a 1GB download on it’s own!  Then after that, it demanded KB2952664 which wanted forever to install, so I said screw it and run the Windows update, which was 199 updates to go. So after all those hours, I’m finally ready to install Windows 10!

Au

I wanted an upgrade!

So during the install, about 25% of the way in, 83% copying files it suddenly reboots, and then starts to restore my prior copy of Windows.  Great, something failed.  Once back in Windows 7 I get this wonderful message:

I love these cryptic errors!

I love these cryptic errors!

0xc1900101 – 0x20004 The installation failed in the SAFE_OS phase with an error during the INSTALL_RECOVERY_ENVIRONMENT operation.

After trying more updates, defraging, it failed to upgrade another two times.  So I googled some more, and it turns out that a lot of people had laptops like this Fujitsu that were partitioned 50/50 and people would convert their disk from a basic MBR to a dynamic disk, so they could destroy the un-needed and wasteful D drive, and merge it into a nice C drive.  So what is the fix? UGH you have to convert the disk back to a basic disk with a normal MBR.  Except You can’t easily revert as you can convert.  So a bunch of more time wasted with a Windows Vista DVD that can read the disk, and an external drive let me copy windows off, redo the disk as MBR and restore Windows.

After all that drama the Windows 10 upgrade went without a hitch!

Bottom line, is that it’s probably easier to just buy a copy of Windows 10.  There is a utility to convert a dynamic disk to a basic disk, Partition Wizard Pro which costs $39.  Which is better towards a copy of 10.

Oh well it’s finally done.

Update review

Update review

Probably a bad time to ask.